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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 280
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CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 7:00pm EST
new york. mr. schumer: well, passing this bill was really a very fine accomplishment, and of course we senators get up and stand up and are very proud of it, as we should be, but without our staffs, we couldn't get any of this done. so i would just like to take a few minutes to thank my staff, many of whom were personally impacted by superstorm sandy, who worked tirelessly to ensure that new york's needs were adequately addressed, as my state continues to react and recover to superstorm sandy and her aftermath. because of their hard work and tireless efforts, i know that new york's needs have been addressed in the sandy supplemental legislation that passed through the senate earlier this evening. my great l.d., heather mchugh, coordinated this effort, making sure every type of aid was considered and included in this package. she has great knowledge of both the senate and the house, and it was invaluable in getting this done. my deputy chief of staff, aaron sagervaun who is just so selfless and wonderful in making sure that every t is crossed and every i is dotted, i thank her as well.
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon i
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:00pm EST
've worked for "the new york times," then it are chief reporter around the world. you're an organist can especially speedy written a book on organ music. living with guns, how did you come to this topic? >> safely because i lived abroad for so many years. i would often be asked by friends in those countries, what is it the united states and americans and guns? what he is such a love affair with guns is the way some of them was sometimes put it. i do my best to explain, but they realized they didn't know myself, so i thought when i retired, when i time i would try to do some research and find out why we have the second amendment and how has it been understood during all the years it's been enforced in the book was the result. >> host: read the book with interest. you cover the history, legal battles, what's going on current day. let's go through a lot of back and starting with the history. with surprise to many of the american history insolvable guns plater didn't play. >> guest: i grew up in massachusetts in the 50s and of course he made a big thing of thanksgiving and not this weekend s
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 1:00pm EST
away. so completely fill my mind that my grades plummeted. i had bucks. the new york public library, thank god for the new york public library. i had books. so when i had the difficulties of my mom, i found my emotional voice and portrait of the artist of the and and, his mother asked him to pray with her. he refused. and that tension. and i had the idea of sometimes being fearful. i had steven crane. books gave me a voice that expressed my individual humanity . and those books then helped turn you into a writer. do you want to talk for a moment of the have you got into writing? >> i began writing. i have speech difficulties as well. my siblings all have speech difficulties. we came up from west virginia. and i could not speak very well or read very well allowed, but eventually the teacher said, okay, you can write something, copied down. if you laugh at me and will, books and you. hit you. depending how far you were. but she said, i could read something. began writing in the palms. i really enjoy that. that was the only thing i was praised for that age. and i enjoyed writing. i dro
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 11:00pm EST
jersey, new york and other hard-hit states as well. but look forward to working with all of you to enable us to recover and rebuild a cell is better protect ourselves from future storms that are likely to come our way. thanks. >> thank you very much, senator. senator cardin. >> thank you, madam chair. let me ask my entire statement be included in the record. thank you so much not just for convening this hearing, but for your leadership in dealing with these issues, but for your leadership in dealing with these issues to the needs of the communities and individuals who issues to the needs of the communities and individuals who impact did by the severe weather events, but your leadership in directing this committee to look at race in which we can make our communities less vulnerable. sandy was a devastating storm. 80 lives were lost as a result of the storm. seven in the state of maryland. 8 million people in the united states for some time were without power as a result of sandy. maryland feared much better than our surrounding states. we spent a lot of our resources to help friends in new
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 8:30pm EST
a conversationalist and became a striking young woman then she had her debut in new york. she came back a few years later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered wit
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
. new york, new jersey, and portions of pennsylvania. the author recalls the importance of the region during the war and visits several sites to document their historical significance and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 9:00am EST
producers traveled the area as we explore the livery seen in new york's capital city and surrounding towns. .. >> and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we in saratoga. >> my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can ask and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world the a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or probably 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany to most recently a south african writer, and
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 1:00am EST
screen is a photograph taken in 1942, buffalo, new york, university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> guest: at a woman who committed suicide at the hotel in buffalo during that year, and a photographer happened to be passing by and took the picture that appeared in "life" at the time and one widely acclaimed award for having been able to catch the moment at the pern's death, at the moment in which the person was about to die. this is really the start of a whole tradition, a whole legacy of photos of people facing death that cluttered our news stations ever since. >> host: you use the word "cluttered," what's the value of seeing that picture? >> guest: the value of the picture like that pulls us in subjectively. it's an emotional, dramatic picture, memorable, pulling in all emotions through which we can engage in the event, the event that it's depicking, and this is important in news because not only do we want to understand what we're seeing, but we want to feel important things about what we're seeing. we want to feel fear, anguish, compassion, mentality, all k
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00pm EST
, interestingly, came as a surprise to me, too, to learn the nra was founded by two "new york times" reporters. >> host: now i know who to blame. >> guest: what they were concerned about was being prepared for national defense like the first world war and making sure that we have enough people in the country who knew how to use firearms that we would not be defeated if it came to a war. >> host: when i grew up, i got the nra badges at summer camp. >> guest: my son got one. >> host: i kept the badges too. it's a point of pride. that was a different nra i think. >> guest: the nra still does a lot of worthwhile training and certifying of ability to use firearms safely, and, but they became politically the leadership that had approved the 68 gun control act was overthrown, replaced by others, and eventually by charles heston was a spokesman for that faction, and now we have, you know, wayne firmly in the saddle, and politically it's very different organization from what it was in 1968, very clearly. it's also been able to raise huge amounts of money and become maybe the most powerful lobby here in
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
print. and the institute was founded in 1983 but officially became the new york state writers' institute in 1984, and over the years we've had more than a thousand writers through. >> my sister was a rabid conservative who, actually, worked at w's first convention. and she couldn't get a room, so she ended up having to stay with me, and she brought a sign she was holding that said "w stands for women." [laughter] and i said, you can stay, but the sign has to go. [laughter] >> as a result, we have a very extensive archive of those writers, the readings, interviews with them, and i guess we like to think of ourselves as perhaps becoming the c-span of literature. i don't know, we'll see what happens with that. but we're about to roll out a, what is, in essence, a kind of virtual research library of all of these videos and audios that we've collected over the years. we're told by many people it's the most thorough going archive of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 6:00am EST
, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional interest but the national interest. we have the highest concentration of population, the most sophisticated delivery system and interconnection, we have light rail, subway, metro, connectors all up and down the corridor so that high-speed rail is not something that will run by itself as opposed to last week where we heard about the major red ministrations effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on whic
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 3:00am EST
time is limited. she has worked for the new york times since 1995. reporting on domestic policy, national politics, immigration, the presidential campaign of 2004, and 2008, and first lady michele obama and her role in the obama white house. i met rachel at an event this year where i bought a book, the book she wrote, "american tapestry: the story of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama". after hearing her talk, i'd bought six more copies. i bought them for all my family members and to give out as christmas gifts. now after having read her book i can tell you it was a good investment. it helps me better understand my own family and many mysteries surrounding my own family. rachel l. swams's book is a compelling story that stirs deep emotions. it is also a story that would break them here and with that, let's welcome rachel l. swams. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. >> thank you for coming. in the years leading up to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:30am EST
is the man who can't miss. of the new york magazine times on its cover proclaimed him as having had transformed publishing and here's why. he holds the guinness record for the most number one "new york times" bestsellers of any author ever. in 2011 it was estimated that one in four of all hardcover suspense thriller novels sold with the bad mr. patterson. selling over 300 billion copies of his books worldwide, that's 300 million copies. he's also the the first other to achieve 5 million e-book sales and by now has probably hit in william as we sit in this room. what is impressive about all of this though is that the successes and based solely on a similar site the ever popular alice crossed in the women's murder club at michael bennet series. he's also the current best-selling author and and a young adult and middle grade categories. it's not just about his success either. he's won the coveted edgar award, the bca mystery guild ruler of the year award from an internist thriller of the year award from the reader's digest readers choice award and the children's choice but councils chi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm EST
by the former "new york times" reporters. but what they were concerned about is being prepared for the national defense like the first world war and making sure that we have enough people in the country and how to use firearms so that we wouldn't be defeated if it came to a war. >> host: when i was going about my nra marksmanship badges i kept those badges. was a sort of private. >> guest: they still do a lot of worthwhile training and the ability to use firearms safely, but they became politically the leadership that had proven the gun control act was overthrown and replaced by others and eventually charlton heston became a spokesman for that action and now we have been firmly in the saddle, and politically it is a very different organization from what it was in 1968 very clearly. it's also been able to raise huge amounts of money and become maybe the most powerful lobby here in washington. and it plays basically on the backlash on people's fear of crime is rising and the police can't do anything about it, then how are we going to keep ourselves from being robbed and murdered, raped, salon? we
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:45pm EST
of the most remarkable aspects of this popular interest was that a newspaper called the new york sun -- this was penny press paper -- took a tremendous interest in this case. now the penny press you will need to know, was a new kind of newspaper meant for a broader part of the population. the old commercial newspapers were more expensive than they were usually bought by upper artisans, merchants and middle-class people and people involved in commerce but the penny press was basically for working people, especially in new york. so the editor of the new york sun sends not only correspondence to new london and the new haven, he also sends artists and i want to show you what one of them produce. now this is an amazing image. here is a pose of a heroic roman conqueror. with his machete in his hand. he is like an avenger of justice, is he not? you have got to put this into the context of most of the graphic representation of people of african descent in this period were racist in the extreme. so, this is a very different kind of image. the first time i saw that i thought my goodness, it mu
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed awards for having been able to capture the moment as the person died, the moment with the person was about to die. and this is really the start of a whole tradition, a whole legacy of those of people facing death that have cluttered our news faces ever since. >> now, you use the word cluttered. what is the value of seeing that picture of the woman jumping? >> the value of a picture like that as it pulls us in subjectively. it is a very emotional picture. very dramatic, very memorable. poles and all kinds of motions for which we are able to engage the event. the a news event it is actually depicting, and this is important because not only do we want to understand why we're seeing, what we want to feel important things about what we're seeing like to fear feel -- feel fear, anguish,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
it in new york and san francisco and seattle and chicago, all of these places, in the london and paris. we see the try um of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% urbanized, the more urbanized countries have on average income levels that are five times higher and infant mortality levels that are less than a third. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. but with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which is too often remaining mired in the unending rural poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almostal of its -- almost all of it existence. it is mumbai, it is delhi, that are the pathways out of po
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
and that is what he was searching for. many classmates call him barry and when he got to new york, those four years in new york city people call him barry and some call him barack. >> host: why did he choose occidental and why transfer to colombia? >> guest: he of people who were going there and the way he tells the story, there was a girly in honolulu who was in that area so he got that -- it was like the next step. it was comfortable, beautiful, small, elite, california sunshine, very comfortable. it was an important two years. restarted to expand intellectually. he got his first sense of destiny in those two years but left because it was too -- he wanted to experience the world and was finding himself. taken to los angeles, to new york and chicago but it is important to get to new york first. he starts his junior year. >> host: his first night in new york city. >> i was a little dubious but turns out to be true. he was not that spending night in that apartment would be better, but he couldn't get in. he couldn't get the keys and couldn't find the landlord, a friend of a friend of his mother, he
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
that either version of the picture or remembers it. if you did, because i saw it here in new york, and i came in a little bit late. i was about -- it was about 20 minutes into the picture, and i sat down right after that, the woman in front of me said to her husband, this is the worst picture i ever saw in my life. [laughter] at the three of us got up and left. [laughter] [applause] and i've never seen the whole movie. [laughter] i wrote screenplays in the '70s, thinking i would be good at it, but wore myself out rewriting scripts for producers who nearly always believed that plot needed more back story. in the winter of 72, swanee called me and asked if i'd read the book by george higgins. i told him i hadn't, hadn't heard of it, and swanee said this is your kind of book. this is your kind of stuff, kiddo your run out and get it before you write another word. i got the book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie brown, at 26, with no expression on his face, said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home in one sitting, it was like 180 pages, and felt like i had bee
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
in new york and new jersey and other northeastern states who were hurt by sandy. we have had some pretty tough disasters in tennessee as well. we had a thousand-year flood a couple years ago -- not 100-year but a thousand year. we knew the federal government wasn't going to make us whole. we had billions of dollars of damage, 52 counties hurt, but we knew the federal government could help and it did and it did swiftly, and that's what we want to do in this case. with all the talk about the money we're about to appropriate, i think it's important to remind those who live in new york and new jersey and connecticut what's already being done with money we have already appropriated. for example, there are 5,460 fema personnel in those states. there are 507,000 citizens of those states who have already filed individual assistance applications. this is when your home's gone and you need money for rent or you need money to rebuild. those applications are in. already $1.09 billion has been paid to those individuals. there are 25 disaster recovery centers in new york, three in connecticut, $150 mi
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 5:30am EST
might have a quarterback controversy brewing in new york and tim t-bill is still waiting for his chance to get on the field and i don't know if he ever will. >>host: 7 will join us who is calling us right now and she is a giants fan and welcome to the football fan shop here at hsn and you are a giants fan are you in new york or a displaced and. >>caller: i and in new york. >>host: you still come to hsn for the best cook but there are ground? >>caller: i have three of these instuff i also ordered another one for my brother. >>host: a year later, how was it will they not? >>caller: the watches good, it feels good. >>host: baby and for an exciting playoff season. >>guest: 11 in maine has been a little off but usually catches fire towards the end. >>caller: money is on the vine, a light comes through for us. and >>host: thank you so much for joining us. have a wonderful weekend think you for sharing your story. she got her through last season and she talks about how great the looks and how wonderful it washes and she is calling back to let you know that this is a speci
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:45am EST
that is so dishonorable as to leave this great nation. i'm leaving immediately for new york. come with me or not. >> so loyalty -- did he say damn the torpedoes? >> did he say damn the -- well, i'm looking -- [laughter] my wife has heard me say this before. the words that i used in the book seem to to me to be the liy ones, that he was actually speaking to the captain of the ship right alongside four bells, captain -- [inaudible] full speed ahead and so on. so it wasn't quite what has come down in history, but the sense of it was pretty much that. and, of course, the question i always and -- ask my students is if he might have said, damn, the torpedoes! [laughter] we may never know. >> as i quote in the book, there was a marine standing near farragut on the hartford when the tecumseh went down and the brooklyn, which was just ahead of the hartford in the line of ships, stopped at the line of torpedoes, and the whole fleet came to a stop at fort morgan who were punishing them. and that's when farragut orderlied the hartford to go ahead of the brooklyn, and the rest of the ships followed, a
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
in places you'd expect; new york, london, frankfurt, tokyo, with a couple of really interesting outliers. and in the outliers was a lot of my story, places like ashford, virginia, where if you ask the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with, they would say, oh, new york, london, los angeles, ashburn, not as if it were this tiny suburb. so it's a surprisingly short list of places that are by far the hot spots, the kind of supernodes on the internet. >> host: what did these supernodes look like, mr. blum, when you visit them? >> guest: well, from the outside, they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. they are quite generic from the outside, deliberately so. they try to hide in plain sight, at least when you're driving by them. inside some of them are in, um, are in old kind of art deco buildings that used to belong to western union or old telecom palaces. others are kind of, have what their operators like to call a cyberific look, kind of the aesthetic adjective of choice, meaning they kind of look like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate.
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
used to sell patricia cornwell. each unto itself. it begs the question when we put an ad in "new york times" come it's not like putting an advertisement for a honda or a cadillac. it is one book. it is not random house advertising on its books. it's one book. it's a very different and very subjective business, which means that you can only fit so much when it comes to marrying books to readers, books for which publishers pay a deal for. when i was at schuster, they paid $8 million, which had been a record number for ronald reagan's memoir, called american life. you know, the math as well as i do. you need to sell 4 million books. not just write a million dollars, you need to sell 250,000. the book actually sold about 300,000 copies. so it was a spectacular failure. because of the comparison. it's a highly complex business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. yo
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 3:45pm EST
. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepreneur, i learned about the fact that you really need to have economic freedom to create jobs. something i learned personally. if you're obviously just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by indi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
times. he's a celebrity because of the debate with douglas. and the speech in new york. at the end of the date purpose was to win the election. he didn't win the election. a speech he gave in new york. we can remember president obama's speech in 2004. the democratic national convention the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure. four years later was about the speech he's not a pauseble candidate for the presidency. he gives a dazzling speech in new york. when he ran for the senate when president obama gave the speech in 2004 he was running for the senate in senate in jill. illinois he lost. think about president obama run for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election. in illinois lincoln is from illinois. the land of lincoln. huge hometown advantage for him. the reason they put it in chicago by one vote, by the way, think voted to put in chicago by one vote. could have been one vote hasn't concerned it. once it's -- in they weren't worried about the home court advantage. it wasn't a player. right. >> they were lists published by maj
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:15am EST
plummeted, but i had looks. i had the new york public library. thank god for the new york public library. and i had books. when i had the difficulties with my mom, i found my emotional voice and portrait of the artist as a young man. his mother asked him to pray with her and he refused. that tension, and when i had the idea of sometimes being fearful, i had that batch of courage. books gave me a voice that expressed my individual humanity. >> books helped used turn into a writer. do you want to talk for a moment about how you got into writing? >> i began writing, i had speech difficulties as well but my siblings all had speech difficulties. we came up in west virginia. i couldn't speak very well or read very well aloud, so eventually a teacher said, right something. i will throw my books that you or hate you. depending on how far she was. she said i could write something and i really enjoyed that. that was the only thing i was praised for at that age. i enjoyed writing. at 15 i was put back into school and at 16 i joined the army on my 17th birthday. >> you have before you one of the mos
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm EST
of the popular interests was that a newspaper called the new york sun, a penny pressed paper, took a tremendous interest in this case. now the penny press you would need to know was a new kind of newspaper meant for a broader part of the population, the old commercial newspapers, they were commercial, and they were bought by merchants, middle class people, people involved in commerce, and the penny press was for working people, especially in new york so the editor of the new york sun sends not only correspondence to new lone done and new haven, but he also sent artists, and i want to show you what one of them produced. now, this is an amazing image. here's the pose of a heroic cop qerer, with his machette in his hand. he's like an avenger of justice, is he not? put this in the context of most of the graphic representations of people of african dissent in this period were racist in the extreme. this is a very different image. first time i saw it, i thought, my goodness, must be a abolitionist group. nope, it's the new york sun. why did they do it? because they thought they would make money selli
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
card and also authorized by reviewing correspondence held in the federal reserve bank of new york. the fed did not like that one bit. and finally over $100 of interviews i assure you can guess. let me turn to some substance. a story of the mansard under five presidents serving under the five greatest crisis in history i will tell you about the crisis first broke crisis number one is cold. some of you may remember nixon suspended foreign central banks to exchange dollars for gold. he called this particular incident the single most significant event. crisis number two is inflation. the annual rate is double-digit in 1979 jimmy carter appointed him chairman of the federal reserve board over the strenuous objection of his advisers who say it is too independent and outspoken. two months later paul volcker raised interest-rate to higher levels than the chairman himself sought 15% of long-term treasury securities and bond commercial banks and loans as a record that still stands. crisis number three is the world financial crisis that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 12:00pm EST
to help the citizens of new york, new jersey, and other parts of the northeast as they recover from the damn of hurricane van dihurricane sandy. as we did before, we have an opportunity to help maim make families and communities whole again. i hope my colleagues will join in moving quickly to send aid to those affected by sandy as they continue to recover and rebuild. the senate must move swiftly to approve supplemental disaster aid and act to give the intelligence community the stools tools it needs to -- the tools it needs to keep our nation safe before the christmas holiday. before we leave for chris marks we'll have to finish our work on sandy and fisa. they're both extremely important, but they have to be completed. so everyone should understand we have that to do, and it appears at this stage we'll see if anything changes -- but it appears that we're going to be coming back the day after christmas to complete work on the fiscal cliff and a few other leftover items. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, i want to start by extending my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims o
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
reprint extracts from that addition in their home, often under dateline. see here is new york six are also a boston gazette issue from 1766. so here the deadline tells me this news came from new york and quit akeley new york newspaper. after action reports are also at primary source of news funds the work begins. so after action reports or when the commanding a third right a summary of the events of the military engagement and send them up the chain. often in america the president of congress. he would share that report with the local newspaper printer. then dad newspaper the sun that and you receive the report appeared in newspapers up and down the colonies. so we are we have 1777 issue of the continental journal. this includes george washington's own account of the battle of trenton and crossing of the delaware. you can see at the top the dateline baltimore. as for congress is meeting at the time. i said earlier that she really don't see a lot of headlines in the 18th century newspapers. mostly defines an excerpt of a letter from. here is the april 21st 1775 issue of the new hampshire ga
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00am EST
a life in new york i liked and i kind of thought i would approach it as a regular reporting gig where i would report, work really hard for a week, get everything done that needs to be done and retreat back to new york. it didn't work out that way and i find myself spending more time here than in new york, making more friends and being inspired by kinsfolk like what you just mentioned, sort of -- there's an interesting energy that it is hard to put your finger on, cooper who live quote in the book is not native, she moved here in the 80s and longtime journalist and really smart thing for about detroit and she talks about how detroit is a place where people are doing things everyday that you are not expected to do and people coming home from work not patrolling their neighborhoods because there are not police, reclaiming vacant lots, turning into gardens or a bird concert tour boarding up vacant houses, there's a chapter in the book about detroit, that surprised me, the extent of that and how real and inspirational that can be. >> some of the characters you come across in your journey in
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 11:00pm EST
and we just offer you our best in this affair. mr. jim keane has been the state director of the new york small business development and are now part since 1994. he oversees 23 regional centers, 35 outreach centers that serve 35,000 small businesses each year. all of your experience, mr. king, will most certainly be called on it tested for the job ahead of you. mr. kevin law is one of the most respected business organizations in new york. the long island economy is made up of over 100,000 businesses, 90% complete 20 people or less. bit with look forward to hearing directly from you about what your business is their same come, many struggling to recover and how we can be as helpful as possible. mayor, let us start with you and again, hearts go out to the people that you've lost and are devastated, but were going to stay with you for the long haul, long road ahead. [inaudible] >> make sure your buttons are pressed and you speak directly into the mic. >> good morning, chairwoman landrieu and committee members. it's an honor to be here today. i am the mayor of hoboken, new jersey. hoboken is
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
of covenant house, and tina kelley, former staff writer for "the new york times," talk about their book on teenage homelessness, "almost home." >> some of them making $7 and change an hour. and many of them working overtime to try to make more money but still qualify for programs like s.n.a.p., and so here we are allowing many of our employees -- especially as i was saying behind the curtain. i think the curtain's there to block the sex and love section. [laughter] do you notice that is the one that's curtained off here? it's like 7/eleven, so you guys should put your book on the sex aisle. [laughter] it would sell much better. >> we should have called the book "50 shades of homelessness." >> yeah. it would have sold a lot better. >> it would have. >> so the -- you guys have such dirty minds. get out of the gutter. [laughter] but these guys, the poignant testimonies you were telling us because we live in a society where here are front line first responders. these guys tell stories about intervening in petty crime. we had one of the buildings that was targeted by some people who had terr
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 7:00pm EST
how it would go. i had a life in new york, likedded my life there, and i thought i would approach it as sort of a regular reporting gig where i would come in, report work, really hard for, like, a week, you know, get everything done i needed done, and then retreat back to new york for four weeks. it didn't work out that way. i mean, i really found myself spending more time here than in new york and really making a lot of great friends, and, really, i don't know. being inspired by, you know, things, like, you know, things like what you just mentioned, you know, the pete bara weekly thing, and just, you know, that -- there is a kind of interesting energy that -- it's hard to put your finger on, but it's, you know, des cooper, you probably know her, i quote here in the book. >> sure. >> she's not innative to detroit, moved here in the 1980s, a long time journalist, a smart thinker about detroit, and she talked about how detroit is the sort of place where, you know, people are doing things every day that you're not expecting to do anywhere else. i mean, people are coming home from wor
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 10:15am EST
new york times." that happen on thursday and they really wanted me to focus on the elite colleges. so a whole chapter on yale and harvard in the book and i mentioned in one case since i'm so used to these cases at this point i'm kind of surprised at how powerful their response was. this was a case where harvard and yale have the game and that's why they play than in football. this is funny thing it is such a big deal but they like to make fun of each other and they have pretty crude slogans plastered on them on t-shirts to make fun of each other. one of them is you can't spell harvard without vd. [laughter] and in 2009 they decided to go highbrow. the ticket quote from the 1920 book by f. scott fitzgerald and it is i believe all harvard men are sissies like i used to be giving it a very pretentious, like a lot of us and extending about why i'm going to princeton. and there are -- and scott fitzgerald, we agree. so they finally got highbrow in this fight and they were banned from having this t-shirt because someone claimed this was meant to be an anti-gang slurs. this isn't the delegat
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 3:00am EST
. this is considered is only harvested or mined in one place in the broad and that is herkimer county in new york and cannot get anywhere also are pretty incredibly and also, it is a stone what it gemstone do know that comes as the kurds with the fasting? is a harder courts then your usual words, since midnight take a look at that number on the screen, we sold over 15,000 of these and this is the best price the liver offer because we do have them $69 and change and those sold out and about a couple of seconds we broke records and they sold out in 30 seconds. today we bring you this fabulous data style, they look like rough cut diamonds and they do sparkle, like each of their remarkable is the resume blooming, mon the when you did what they incur warranty and $49.90 if you're shopping tips come in there is nothing more spectacular and they did a beautiful with any complexion, hair fur and a bad day of the great with denim but also because of the white diamonds they possess that tenants, he said with this circuit this and it is truly a tree. you're owning a piece of america, the united states, this
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
in california and that was brodrick one. back in new york more tom was a runner, a porch boy coming it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching campaign. so that was the genesis. i thought this has got to be written. so while the series of tiny bits and pieces, diaries and stuff; it's a. but this is a result. i took out as they do, 40,000 words. can you imagine? spicer have over shop may mark, but i do love it. it's the most fun. i guess they could read you some know if you'd like. this may take a second. i've never read in public record. so
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight e
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
to los angeles and new york, but it was first important to get to new york first. >> host: he starts at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. even
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 6:00am EST
there is the tiramisu and you can get the cheesecake from new york. you can combination or option. you can get the chocolate trouble or tiramisu cake,ruffle art tiramisu cake, tea's or tiramisu cake for cake for the chocolate truffle and cheesecake and tiramisu >>guest: we do not overcook the cake it stays nice and moist once we take them out of the% oven we3 cheesecake stay in refrigerator and we molded it takes 24 hours to make agreed tuesday. this is unbelievable. >>host: yours is so good it has such great flavor. what i love about your cakes and they're not sharing their subtle and delicious. when you put them in your mouth they x load with flavor. these a customer picks and order start over here we are gonna start with the tiramisu and cheesecake that is your first choice. you get the chocolate truffle cake and tiramisu bat is your second choicechoice and finally you can choose a the chocolate trouble and the cheesecake.escher willingham 360 leftreally have 360 lots. >>guest: is the dust by chocolate and 7 layer cake that the chocolate trouble at ise real trick deal. deal. >>guest:
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
because i will be in new york for that. hello. i will see you later. that was good. do you know who it is dedicated to? >> no. >> it's a crackerjack surprise inside. has your husband read it yet? spent he's busy. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i hadn't planned to say anything but since i'm late, my publisher, editor at eagle told me it would be polite for me to say something. so i just want to for startup i think it's all human events fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. and thank you so much for all come tonight. sensuality anything about this in any of the mainstream media, except the view, love those gals. i really, really do love them because everything they were saying is everything released by the near times. but "the new york times" is too chicken to argue with me about it. and without sounding like this paranoid, i've never had a book as ignored by the mainstream media as this book. my first book i did a series
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30pm EST
are the national press club for the annual authors night and we are joined now by michael ward and of the new york times. in the game is his most recent book. if you could summarize this for us. >> this took me three years and it's the first comprehensive history of the war and iraq and i think what makes it unique is i incorporate not only the views of the american policymakers but all of the iraqi leadership from maliki, their rivals, their adversaries, the former insurgents, and so i incorporated the iraqi account of what was going on as well as the american account and what is happening on the battlefield and the war in iraq. i try to put all together in one book. >> why you call it to the endgame? >> because i covered the surge and its the endgame of american military involvement and i spent the last third of the book covers the obama administration that hasn't been well covered by the media and i learned a lot from doing this and during the campaign president obama talked about the gold at the end of the war in iraq and we certainly took down the troops but what i discovered in doing the boo
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugur
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
university in new york and now mercy college. i should also mention my wife does the income from festival, so we have a film festival as well. a lot of things that we do and really enjoy it. >> what did you do for the cia? >> question. i was an economist on the brazil desk very much involved with commodities in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucratic for me. so i wanted to break out and do something more on gennaro. i get involved in the financial revolution, started being a managing editor of a news article, the inflation survival letters in the 1970's which is now called personal finance, a much more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinker
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
and speak tonight on both sides of the aisle. and i also note that the gentlelady from new york and the gentleman from connecticut also wish to speak. mr. president, senators -- their states who have been very hard hit should have the opportunity to speak. i'm going to take my rebuttal of the coburn amendments and just abbreviate them. with the exception of being willing to accept the amendment where you can't get emergency assistance if you are a tax cheater or if you've passed away, with the exception of a funeral benefit i really object to the coburn amendment. my objections have been so well articulated by the gentleman from new york, mr. schumer; by the gentleman from new jersey, mr. menendez, i'm not going to preet them. i'm going to ask unanimous consent that my written rebuttals be in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: and in the interest of time, i think we're all agreed the very intent to save money by adding delay and bureaucracy will cost money and will cost time in terms of getting people back on their feet in both their home and in
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